At Out Up at Work

Here are a few questions someone asked me about speaking at work.

1) What can I say if someone criticizes something I've done? What can I say if someone asks me to check my work?

Here are a few possibilities.

A) Okay, I'll take another look at it.
B) You're right. I'll review it again.
C) Okay, I'll check that out again.
D) Okay, I'll check it out again.
E) Okay, I'll check it again.
F) Okay, I'll check that again.

2) What's the difference between "check" and "check out" in this context?

The choice depends on the speaker's viewpoint.

Check and Check out

Check - Use "check" to find out if a correction is necessary, to look at something that does not involve a process or some type of extended time, or to check one item or a series of items one item at a time. If you "check" something, it could mean taking a quick look at it or, depending on what you're checking, it could take longer.

Check out - Use "check out" when speaking of something that involves more observation or that takes longer to do.

Note that "check" and "check out" can be used interchangeably. The choice depends on the speaker's viewpoint.

Examples

A) Can you check this for me, please? - Is there anything wrong with it? Tell me if there's anything wrong with it.
B) Check this out. - Look at it and observe it. And maybe respond in some way.

3) What's the difference between "clean" and "clean up"?

Clean and Clean up

The choice depends on the speaker's viewpoint.

Clean up - This is less specific and usually refers to a whole activity. Here's an example: Let's clean up the lab.

Clean - This is usually more restrictive. I'm going to clean the refrigerator.

Use "clean up" after you use the kitchen to do a lot of cooking and it's a mess. You could say Let's clean up the kitchen.

Using "up" indicates or implies completeness and that the process could be longer or extended in some way.

Note that "clean" and "clean up" could be used interchangeably. It depends on the context. The choice depends on the speaker's viewpoint.

4) What's the difference between "see you later" and "see you later on"?

See you later and See you later on

The choice depends on the speaker's viewpoint.

See you later. - This could mean today or at some other time after today.
See you later on. - Using "on" indicates a progression of time. This could mean today or some other time after today.

Note that "see you later" and "see you later on" can easily be used interchangeably. The choice depends on the speaker's viewpoint. Though it could be that one is more likely or more usual in certain sentences or contexts, it's difficult to come up with specific guidelines for this.

Examples

1. Arriving in morning:

See you later on. The day is not finished. This could mean you're going to see the person at a meeting or before the day is finished.

2. Going home in the afternoon:

See you later. No time is specified. The day is finished. This likely means "see you tomorrow or the next workday".